Supermarket aisle angel

Like a Morrissey song,

The shop was suddenly staffed by the white working class,

As if the thunder had actually begun…!

The working poor of inner Salford,

Overweight,

And pallid…

I shrugged my Firetrap clad shoulders,

I thought nothing of it

Until this chattery Irish minx made me laugh,

A boy with all the charm of a Gaelic god.

With his little beanie hat in winter.

His pale, translucent skin.

His slim waist

The way his Adidas trackie bottoms cling to him.

Wild lockdown hair

Beautiful!

I liked the way he mopped his receding brown hair with a blue paper towel after shifting crates of strawberries and lemons.

While I rotted my teeth on cherry-coke,

I am in my flat months later

It’s a stifling summer…

I’m

With a cup of tea…

Down walls

Down endless corridors

“Pared blancos”

Or Guernica in the Thyssen

Computer walls

Lost in the metropolis

A head full of music and memories

We should have run away to imbibe espresso and la cultura beneath the stunted skyscrapers of Montevideo and pretend to be Lorca’s…

On what money?

I don’t know

He was sex,

I couldn’t attract him

He left it open than he might be bi

He gave me his number

Then asked me not to use it

He was reactionary like that

An Irish stormtrooper of the sacred heart

A narco terrorist of desire

He committed blitzkreig against my body-mind

He violently overturned my senses

And my puppy pouch with Ash…

Then flew away on his mountain bike over the Cork and Kerry mountains.

Back to his Joyce-reading pop.

In a quantum reality we could have been boyfriends,

A younger boyfriend

He lit me up like Fukushima

Poor cute Ash disturbed by this Deus ex Machina

Kill my relationship like

Raskolnikov under the rascacielos

My lovely ash

Loyal as a duck

I could have been torn by powerful forces

Not to be /

* rascacielo is Spanish for sky-scraper

* Raskolnikov is the central character in “Crime and Punishment” who murders his landlady to prove the will to power.

* Lorca was a queer Spanish poet murdered by fascists in the civil war.

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